Kelly Shepard Roy

Volunteer: Kelly Shepard Roy

Bio:

Kelly and Matt Roy served on Kioa Island in Fiji. Kelly served as a Small Business Advisor in the Integrated Environmental Resource Management program concentrating on the areas of alternative livelihood and family budgeting as well as marketing for the island through business generation strategies. For more info on their adventures, check out their blog at http://vaportrail.typepad.com/ and for more information on Kioa please visit the website Kelly created at http://kioaisland.org/.

2009 - 2010


Contributions from Kelly Shepard Roy

  1. Fiji Lessons Learned

        1. Always wear a sports bra when riding the bus. 2. Hiking for an hour burns 500 calories. 3. Your dream needs to become a reality when it haunts you like a nightmare. 4. Powdered milk ain't so bad. 5. In Fiji, I am more likely to die from a falling coconut than a shark attack. 6. When traveling to the big city concentrate on the 3 C's ... cheese, chocolate, and cold beer! 7. You know you go to bed too early when your neighbor asks if you have problems with your electricity. 8. M...

  1. Fiji Traditional Moves

    This is our friend Filo performing the fatele, traditional dance. The Kioans record their history only in songs - nothing is written down. So they pass their stories to their children during holidays, funerals, and celebrations by singing and dancing.

  2. Fiji Gift Presentation

    At the end of our service we attended a fatele, traditional celebration, presented by our friends on the island. After the eating, singing, and dancing the final installment was a presentation of many gifts. Rather than just hand us the gifts the women would dance and sing as they carried them to us. Everything the Kioans do is done with joy and purpose. 

  3. Fiji Te Ano

    Te Ano is the name of a traditional game the islander’s play every New Years. Ano is the name of the large ball they play with that is the size of a softball but is actually a stone wrapped with leaves. The game is played on a rugby pitch with two teams facing each other within large rectangular boxes running the length of the field. The two rectangles are slightly offset and the server for each team stand directly in front of the opposing teams rectangle. The entire village could probably ...

  4. Fiji Man Skirt?

    Yes, men wear skirts but in Fiji they call them sulus. It is really just 3 yards of fabric. They can be colorful with flowers or more recently they are screened with a logo, bible verse, or brand.

  5. Fiji A Warrior's Greeting

    The Prime Minister of Tuvalu came to Kioa during the Christmas holiday celebration. He is being greeted by a canoe flotila of men and women serenading him.

  6. Fiji Bravo Sprays

    The children are performing a traditional Polynesian dance during the Kioa Day celebration marking the day the first settlers arrived from Tuvalu. When a spectator is pleased with the performance they spray the dancer with perfume, as Kanesa is doing here.  

  7. Fiji Hard Work

    Each project on the island begins and ends with a celebration and dedication. Here the pastor and chief are blessing and praying for the completion of a new water tank. The Lima Malosi (strong hand) workforce is looking on and ready to begin the work.

  8. Fiji Ice Cream Soup

    The children are swarming around Filo who is dishing out melted ice cream at a church picnic. The ice cream was brought from the nearest grocery store across the Somosomo straight on a hour long fiber boat ride. By the time it reached the island it was totally melted - but the kids didn't seem to mind!

  9. Fiji Fakaala All the Time

    The Kioans pride themselves on celebrations and what makes the best celebration - food. The more food, the wealthier you are, the more celebrated the individual (whether a birthday or funeral or wedding). We are probably the only Peace Corps Volunteers who actually gain weight during our service!

  10. Fiji Warrior Moves

    The men perform warrior dances during the fatele, traditional dance, as they tell their history. The traditional costume includes flowers and plants native to the island.

  11. Fiji Test Results Are In

    Students in Fiji take standardized tests just like in America. On our island the leaders and community gather together while the students are testing. There is a service, prayer, and a feast celebrating the expected results. After the test is completed and sealed the teacher goes over the tests with the kids because they are so anxious to see how well they did!

  12. Fiji Fatele Fancy Feet

    We were stationed on Kioa Island in Fiji. It was a unique situation because the island was inhabited by a group of Polynesians in the midst of Melanesian Fiji. Kioa was bought in 1946 by the people of Vaitupu, an island in the nation of Tuvalu, with money earned from American Armed Forces during WWII and settled October 26, 1947 by 37 original settlers. The Tuvaluans brought with them only their culture, religion, and lifestyle - which have been preserved and are still in tact today. This i...

  13. Fiji Wedding Bliss

      We were stationed on Kioa Island in Fiji. It was a unique situation because the island was inhabited by a group of Polynesians in the midst of Melanesian Fiji. Kioa was bought in 1946 by the people of Vaitupu, an island in the nation of Tuvalu, with money earned from American Armed Forces during WWII and settled October 26, 1947 by 37 original settlers. The Tuvaluans brought with them only their culture, religion, and lifestyle - which have been preserved and are still in tact today. This i...

  14. Fiji Just throw it in the dirt until it's cooked...

    Here, our Turaqa ni Koro is preparing a lovo, earth oven, for our welcoming lunch. A traditional lovo is a fire made in a pit lined with heat resistant stones. When the stones are hot from the fire the food wrapped in banana leaves or set in coconut bilos is placed in the pit and covered with soil and leaves until ready to eat!

  15. Fiji Got Milk?

    Actually Turani is teaching my husband, Matt, how to harvest coconut water - the clear liquid inside young green coconuts. (Coconut milk, lolo, is from the mature brown coconuts.) Fresh green coconuts are harvested from the tree and then husked and a hole is bored into the top. The louder your sucking noise, the more you enjoy the drink!

  16. Fiji Yaqona Ceremony

    Everything in Fiji starts, continues, and stops with a traditional yagona ceremony. Yaqona comes from the dried root of the pepper kava plant and is a tranquilizing but nonalcoholic drink served in a coconut bilo.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.