Jacqueline Ramirez

Volunteer: Jacqueline Ramirez

Bio:

Raised in Visalia, California by Jim and Diana Ramirez with three siblings. I attended the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 2008, I received a bachelor's degree in Psychology and minor in Sociology. Two years after I worked for Clemmie Gill's Science and Conservation outdoor education school in Tulare County. In 2009, I submitted my application to the Peace Corps and in September 2010, I was sworn-in as an environment volunteer in Mali, West Africa!

2010 - 2012


Contributions from Jacqueline Ramirez

  1. Mali Piece of Meat

    I eat with my host family for lunch and dinner. I have to say I am a very lucky volunteer, because my family cooks very well. Most meals are served with some meat or fish and at the end my host mother divides it up so every one gets a portion. One day after I finished lunch and gave my blessings of thanks, I walked into my hut to take a multi-vitamin. Seconds later, five-year old, Shaka flies by my door screaming and crying; immiediately I think oh no someone is going to hit him. I walk outsi...

  1. Mali Is this in America?

    Shaka, a five year old that lives in my concession. Number one asked question of all time, is _______ in America? It could be anything, a cat, chair, sandal, rice, etc. This time he asked if there is a machine like this one in America, I did not know for sure, so I just said there are machines and maybe one in America is the same.

  2. Mali In the Bush

    Koniaba and I after our day in the bush. Collecting shea fruit in the bush is like a long Easter egg hunt, walking back 2 miles with a bunch of it balanced on your head is kind of difficult. Maybe next year I'll be able to say "Hey look, no hands!'

  3. Mali How do you say massage?

    During a training break in our homestay village, Peace Corps Volunteer Matt receives a massage from a local boy. One of the many benefits of speaking a local language.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.