Chris Miller

Volunteer: Chris Miller

Bio:

Chris is a native of Portland, Oregon. Currently, he's a Peace Corps volunteer in Artemovsk, Ukraine. He blogs about his experiences abroad at Borderland-Chronicles.com.

2010 - 2012


Contributions from Chris Miller

  1. Ukraine Skvazniak

    Last summer, in the August heat, I was on a bus with two other volunteers on our way to visit our friend in Novaazovsk. People were packed into this bus like sardines in a can, many standing shoulder-to-shoulder in the aisle way. The three of us occupied most of the rear bench seat. The temperature outside was somewhere near 40 degrees, putting the temperature on the bus somewhere near an unbearable 43 degrees. The trip would take about five hours. The minimal free-flowing air on the bus cam...

  2. Ukraine Journalism Club

    I started a journalism club at my school. As a journalist, I thought I knew what I was getting into. But I had to teach the damn thing mostly in another language. In Russian, as a matter of fact. Something I'd overlooked. And it wasn't easy. Eight students showed up to the first meeting. When discussing investigative journalism I told them anything that doesn’t piss someone off isn’t worth writing. Then I tried saying – in Russian – “You’ve got to light a fire under their ass.” Unfortunatel...

  3. Ukraine What The Cluck?

    Something happened at the local bazaar the other day. While doing my daily produce shopping I found myself in perhaps the most helpless and intriguing situation I've been in thus far here in Ukraine. It began with a bump and ended with a thud. Someone had elbowed me in my backside. A mistake, more than likely. People squeeze into the narrow paths of the markets on their way to and from the many kiosks like wriggly little fish would if you were to put them all in the same bowl. The jab to my...

  4. Ukraine In Winter, Still a Warm Place

      Winter has arrived, that bitingly cold and miserably wet season dreaded by many PCVs in Ukraine. For me, it’s my first. Having arrived in March of 2010, I’d only heard the horrors of the worst Ukrainian winter in decades, about stranded buses, and broken space heaters, streets caked with ice and the feeling of being held prisoner in your own apartment. In June, while listening to these stories told by group 36 and 37 volunteers, I felt as though winter was a world away. Now, it’s here.   Tr...

  1. Ukraine Veteran honored on Victory Day

    Each year on May 9 countries of the former Soviet Union celebrate Dyen Pobyediy (День Победы!), or Victory Day, marking its defeat of Nazi Germany and the end of the Great Patriotic War (known in the U.S., of course, as the Second World War). And each year cities across Ukraine and other former countries of the Soviet Union celebrate with parades and other festivities. In Artemovsk, my small eastern Ukrainian home, a parade kicked off the occasion. Beginning at the city center and winding it...

  2. Ukraine Flowers

    Babushkas line the pathways of the local markets in eastern Ukraine, selling flowers and other colorful goods. On a holiday, most of them will go through scores of roses, tulips and carnations.

  3. Ukraine Men's Day

    Male students at a village school in eastern Ukraine participate in an annual Men's Day competition February 23, 2011. The strongest and wittiest wins a bronze trophy and the affection of many female students.

  4. Ukraine Soviet-era factory rubble

    Before the fall of the Soviet Union, the city of Konstantinovka bustled with more than 20 factories, which provided thousands of jobs. Today, less than a handful of factories remain in operation. Two PCVs stand atop the rubble.

  5. Ukraine Kiev Pechersk Lavra

    The Kiev Pechersk Lavra, one of the Seven Wonders of Ukraine, with its golden tops and intricate ornamentations, is best when visited on a sunny summer's day. Its sprawling grounds, home to a number of underground caves, overlook Kiev's Dnieper River.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.