More recent posts about Niger

Articles from Niger

  1. Niger At the Feet of the Chief

    Eid ul-Fitr (the celebration of the end of Ramadan) started a few days after I arrived in my site. I lived near the village chief, and while I was walking by his house one day during this celebration, he pulled me into his entryroom to sit next to him and observe these men serenading him.

  2. Niger Mother and child

    Abdul Samad discovers his mother's hijab.

  3. Niger Braids

    9-year-old Charifa shows off her Eid ul-Fitr hair.

  4. Niger Mr. President

    The solemn and proud president of a Peace Corps-initiated student government, in Kollo, Niger.

  5. Niger Tabaski Henna

    My host-sister in Niger washes her feet after applying henna in preparation of the celebration of Tabaski.  

  6. Niger Fishbowl

    These stares were a familiar sight as I wandered about Kantche, my village.  Luckily, these boys didn't insist on doing karate moves when I asked to take their picture.

  7. Niger Old Man

    I ran into this cheeky old man while visiting the relatives of my host family.  He refused to leave unless I took his picture.

  8. Niger Plunder

    While walking 12k to a bush village for a naming ceremony, we came across a seasonal lake where a group of young boys were scouring the pond for fish.  This young boy was proud to show us his plunder.

  9. Niger Fishing in the Desert

    A few young boys used nets to catch the remaining fish in the seasonal lake before it dried up completely.

  10. Niger Troublemaker

    I spent a few days at the village kindergarten and, with the permission of the teacher, decided to take picutres of the kids to hang around the classroom.  This little stinker would be my next door neighbor who, with the help of his younger twin brothers, has been known to thow things into my concession.

  11. Niger Guerwol Beauty Contest

    Every year, hundreds of Wodaabe herders gather in the desert for the Guerwol festival, a celebration consisting of dancing, singing, and a traditional male beauty pageant.  The men paint their faces red and line their lips and eyes in black.  They bare their teeth and widen their eyes, as these features are considered most attractive.  I was fortunate enough to witness the festival in 2009.

  12. Niger Happy Girls

    Girls from different villages in the Zinder region bond during our week-long Girls' Empowerment Camp.

  13. Niger Snack Line

    The girls in this kindergarten class in Kantche, Niger line up to have kunnu (a millet based porridge) as a morning snack.

  14. Niger Sixth grade

    This is the size of a typical sixth grade classroom in Niger. Notice the boy:girl ratio.

  15. Niger Next to the chief

    My view in the chief's entryroom on the first day of Eid al-Fitr (the celebration of the end of Ramadan)

  16. Niger Snack time!

    A typical snack in Niger - tastes like potato chips!

  17. Niger Training

    In Niger, girls playing sports was unheard of, and they were normally never permitted to wear shorts. These girls are representing their middle school (in the background) in a regional soccer tournament organized by PCVs. Although there were many challenges, the girls learned a lot, loved playing, and helped advance the role of women in their culture. 

  18. Niger Gluttony

    Peace Corps Volunteers in town for some RandR compete in a mango eating contest. Our driver talked a good game but topped off at a meager 6 mangoes. The two ladies with backs to the camera tied for the win, each eating an astonishing 12 mangoes! 

  19. Niger Allah kawo ruwa

    Village men pray for rain. 

  20. Niger Color

    The ubiquitous colorful printed cloth that people wear throughout Africa.

  21. Niger Thank You, girls...

    These 3 girls lived next door to family I was living with during my Peace Corps training. They were nothing but smiles and positive energy the entire time - I kept this picture with me and would look at it during the hard days of my service - how can this one not make you smile? even when you're crying because you're 2,000 miles from home, can't understand the language, and wish beyond wishing that suffering did not exist for anyone in the world.

  22. Niger Movie Night

    I was visiting a friend and went to a little store to get some cold drinks. When I stepped in I looked to my right and out the side door I saw all these faces staring back at me (well sort of). Then I realized all these people were watching TV, not me. They really could have cared less about be standing there, well that is until I pulled out my camera, then I got a little more attention.

  23. Niger Nap Time

    While helping out with a Girl's Camp I came across this beautiful sight. I love it because it is so counter cultural. All of these girls, some had just met each other a few days ago, all squished together on this mat taking a rest in the afternoon. Can you imagine this happening in the USA?

  24. Niger COS Conference Niger 2003

    Here is a photo of Volunteers in Niger at their COS conference which took place at the Parc W in Niger, West Africa.  There were babboons and other animals watching us as we celebrated our service and learned about readjusting to American Life.

  25. Niger Hot hats

    I went to the little store in my town and found these two boys and girl with self-made grass hats.  I ran home to get my camera and take their picture.  These kids couldn't stop laughing at themselves and their grass hats.

  26. Niger I had a horse in Africa

    When I was growing up, I was a horse fanatic.  I knew everything about horses--except how to actually ride.  Eventually, I grew out of that.  But shortly after college, I found myself as an agriculture/rural development Volunteer in Anam Tondi, Niger, 8 km through the sand to Ouallam, the nearest market town.  Peace Corps gave us transportation options.  I tried a mountain bike, but quickly (after one trip) realized that 8 km in the sand in 110 degree heat was not what "Outside" mag...

  27. Niger Making an Improved Cookstove

    This is a picture of me and a bunch of my favorite Nigerien children whom I was teaching how to make an improved cookstove out of mud and dung. 

  1. Niger A Day in the Life

    (a description of a day in the life of a niger peace corps trainee, from my blog: www.xanga.com/astronomigirl)   “There is one way to understand another culture: Live it.  Move into it, ask to be tolerated as a guest, learn the language.  At some point, understanding may come.  It will always be wordless. The moment you grasp what is foreign, you will lose the urge to explain it.”   The call to prayer sounds every morning at sunrise, wailing “Allaaaaaahu Akbar!” as the men make their way to ...

  2. Niger Homemade Holidays

    (Taken from my blog: http://laballard.wordpress.com/2008/11/25/homemade-holidays/) This past weekend our region of volunteers celebrated Thanksgiving together.  It was a potluck style dinner that was fashioned from random findings in the city or from treasures shipped from home.  There was even stuffing, mashed potatoes, pie, deviled eggs, cookies, salad, turkey, cheese ball, gravy, and rolls to be had.  The dilemma comes when everything takes just a little longer than it normally would to pr...

  3. Niger Washing machine

    Each evening in Niger I had dinner with Chatou, the wife of the schoolteacher.  One night, her eyes grew very big as she asked me: "Maimouna, I heard... that in America, you have a machine that washes clothes!"  I confirmed this for her, and she asked me how it worked.  In my best Zarma, I described a large metal box, with a tube to connect to the water pump outside, and with basket with holes in it on the inside.  The basket fills up with water ("How does it fill up, if there ...

  4. Niger Not my sector

    After being installed in the tiny village of Ichirnawa at the start of my service, my days consisted of walking around, greeting people in Hausa, getting to know my neighbors, and adjusting to daily life. One place I liked to sit in the morning was at the 2-room health clinic, where the nurse spoke French and there was always a pot of tea brewing. One day within my two weeks in the village I was hanging around at the health clinic as usual with my friend the nurse. He disappeared inside, and ...

  5. Niger Goodbye Niger

    It was too green. The cows were too fat, the children too clean, the roads too well-paved. I turned to Mariah, my bus buddy on for the two hours from the airport in Casablanca to Rabat, the capital of Morocco. “Are we really still in Africa?” “I’m not really sure of anything anymore,” she wearily responded. It had been four sleepless days since Peace Corps had announced that we were leaving Niger. Ten anxious days since terrorists with ties to Al Qaeda had kidnapped two French nationals ...

  6. Niger Goodbye Niger

    It was too green. The cows were too fat, the children too clean, the roads too well-paved. I turned to Mariah, my bus buddy on for the two hours from the airport in Casablanca to Rabat, the capital of Morocco. "Are we really still in Africa?" "I'm not really sure of anything anymore," she wearily responded. It had been four sleepless days since Peace Corps had announced that we were leaving Niger. Ten anxious days since terrorists with ties to Al Qaeda had kidnapped two Fr...

  7. Niger Comes A Horseman

    COMES A HORSEMAN Joel Neuberg July 11, 2011   I once owned three horses. When I arrived to begin two years service as a Peace Corps volunteer in the village of Guecheme, Niger (West Africa) in the summer of 1967, I discovered I had inherited a house, a houseboy, and a horse. The house was a substantial mud brick structure with a cement floor and a corrugated iron roof. The downside to the house was that it was a school building about a quarter mile from the main village in a low lyi...

  8. Niger Tombola

    TOMBOLA NATIONAL Joel Neuberg July 15, 2011   The California Lottery is, of course, a tax on the poor (and foolish and desperate) to benefit the rich (and the would-be-richer), but the taxers in Cal and Texas could learn a lot from their counterparts in the Republic of Niger of the 1960s. The national lottery in Niger (Tombola National) had a simple system for raising revenue, selling all the tickets it prints, and assuring nationwide income from people who have even less hope of winn...

  9. Niger Streets of Lido

    THE STREETS OF LIDO Joel Neuberg July 16, 2011   At the end of the 1968 rainy season, I moved into the recently abandoned Jack Saunders residence in Lido, Niger. Jack abandoned the house, a two-room adobe brick thatch-roofed African hut with a mud floor, because he was extending for a third year to ensure the success of his plan to bring democracy and a form of literacy to the peanut markets of the farmers’ cooperatives in our part of West Africa. He had a car, a little French Deux Ch...

  1. Niger Hard to Explain

    one of the hardest parts of the readjustment process has been trying to summarize my experience. people keep asking me for the highlights and the low points, the best and the worst - but how can you summarize 27 months of living abroad with the peace corps?  this video is my attempt to capture one of the most challenging and wonderful experiences i've ever known, and an homage to a country and people i'll never forget...   music: "hard to explain" by The Strokes

  2. Niger Bush Taxi Quiz

    Bush taxis are my most frequent mode of transportation here in Niger. Often times family and friends think I am exagerating about the number of people who ride inside one vehicle. This is video proof that I am not lying. There really is ALWAYS room for one more :)

  3. Niger Two Years in Three Minutes

    The last two years of my life in three minutes, with photographs from Niger, Benin, Togo, Ghana, Senegal, Morocco, Tunisia, Italy, and Spain.

Niger

Niger

Map of Niger
status
Open
program dates
1962-Present
current volunteers
126
cumulative volunteers
3,058

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.