More recent posts about Morocco

Articles from Morocco

  1. Morocco Pouring Tea

    When my parents came to visit, my friends and colleagues treated them to delicious Moroccan tea at the youth center where I spent most of my time. Pictured are two local counterparts, Lahcen and Rachida.

  2. Morocco HIV/AIDS Awareness Campaign

    During my service, I worked with local community organizations on various campaigns. This is a picture from one of our HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns where we walked around the city passing out literature and talking with community members about the disease.

  3. Morocco Look What We Caught!

    I was walking home one day from the Boys and Girls Club-type place where I worked, and some of the local kids ran up to me screaming, "Teacher, teacher! Look what we caught!." I was quite impressed. They're a lot smarter than I was at that age. Did you know how to catch birds when you were in elementary school? I made sure that the birds were released unharmed.

  4. Morocco What's a Tagine?

    Tagine, noun. A North African stew of spiced meat and vegetables prepared by slow cooking in a shallow earthenware cooking dish with a tall, conical lid. ORIGIN from Moroccan Arabic: frying pan.

  5. Morocco Essaouira Seagulls

    Essaouira is a gorgeous coastal city with a centuries old Portuguese fort that sits along Morocco's Atlantic coast and is about 90 minutes west of Marrakech. In my humble opinion, it's one of the most relaxing places in all of Morocco. The seagulls must think so too cause there's a whole lot of em.

  6. Morocco Moroccan Santa Claus

    For a Muslim country, this one was a bit surprising. I stopped in a big supermarket called Marjane one day when I was in Marrakech and right in front of the entrance was this guy dressed as Santa Claus. For about $5 you could take a picture with him and the animals and I just couldn't pass up the opportunity. Merry Christmas!

  7. Morocco Marrakech Food Stalls

    American writer Paul Bowles said that without Jemaa L'fna, "Marrakech would be just another Moroccan city." The square, which is translated as the Mosque at the End of the World, comes alive at night as foreign and Moroccan tourists, not to mention your average Marrakchi, circles around snake charmers, fortune tellers, storytellers, musicians and magicians. They are fed by over 100 food stalls which operate from late afternoon well into the night, adding a smoky haze to one of the most unique...

  8. Morocco Dress up

    Graduation day for the women at our local Nedi Niswi (Women's Center) is a great excuse for the important folk in town to come out, show their support and drink tea.  As part of the pre-certificate entertainment, many of the students from the center's preschool class performed a variety of songs for the onlookers.  This girl, strikingly beautiful dressed as a mini-Tashelheet bride, looks less than thrilled by her upcoming performance. 

  9. Morocco A Woman On Her Own

    Rare amongst many rural Moroccans, this young unmarried woman traveled throughout the country selling her weaving thanks in part to the support of local Peace Corps Volunteers. As she was showing me how to weave this day we talked about  her experiences travelling without male accompaniment and how that has changed the way she is viewed in her small mountain community. 

  10. Morocco End of Market Day

    I shot this photo in my site near the end of my service just as the market day was coming to a close.

  11. Morocco Ait Ouelo, Morocco

    This was taken outside my host family's ancestral home in the Atlas mountains in Morocco. I had spent an incredible two days there, meeting all the relatives, sharing wonderful food, and learning about their family farm. One of my favorite memories.

  12. Morocco Making bread

    This is my friend Zhor, taking fresh bread out of a clay oven. The women's association in the village of Ait Messoud began a project to sell their bread in the neighboring villages, as well as the larger town nearby. Eventually, we were able to expand the project to include hand rolled couscous.

  13. Morocco The Tannery

    Medina Qadima Fez

  14. Morocco The Prophet's Birthday

    This boy was photographed from my house as he overlooked the festival for the Prophet Mohammed's birthday in Goulmima, Morocco.

  15. Morocco Something Interesting That Way Is

    I don't recall what these boys were looking at, but it must have been pretty great to capture all of their attentions at once.

  16. Morocco Pop Rocks: Cultural Exchange

    I stopped by a local shop to pick up some food before going to my host family's house for lunch and I noticed that they sold Pop Rocks. My host mom and I had so much fun. :)

  17. Morocco Where To?

    My host brother is running out of territory, yet presses on.

  18. Morocco The carnival comes to town but once.

    A cool shot from the taxi stand in Goulmima, Morocco.  A typical everyday scene but for the carnival in the background, which really makes the white pop out.

  19. Morocco American Pizza Night!!!

    It really only took one experience to hook my host family on American Pizza.  In short order it became a weekly tradition.  Here my host brother Nunu displays the goods.

  20. Morocco Eid al-Adha

    Joy on the morning of Eid al-Adha

  21. Morocco Middle of nowhere lesson

    Teaching nomadic women about family planning

  22. Morocco Boy and Chicken

    favorite neighbor boy holding his chicken

  23. Morocco Ramadan with the host family

    Spending Ramadan with my fantastic homestay family

  24. Morocco Roof Vineyard

    My friend Rich's host father has grapes growing across the top of their roof and let me take his picture when I stopped in this past summer for a visit. The vines snake down the front of the house and must be decades old.

  25. Morocco This Too Shall Pass

    Traveling the treacherous mountain roads of Morocco by grand taxi.

  26. Morocco Boxing in Marrakesh

    This picture was taken in the Jemaa Lfna, Marrakesh Morocco. The Jemaa Lfna is a place to see snake charmers, monkeys, story tellers and acrobats and fortune tellers. I had a chance to meet up with my friend Chris for a few hours while he was passing through Marrakesh. Chris has been a mime for 20+ years, and has traveled all over the world. My friend Chris wanted to his routine of magic tricks and making balloon animals. It didn't take him long to find a man (the guy in the red hat) who had ...

  27. Morocco Southern Hospitality

    Gracious host mother, Hakima, serves a homemade meal.

  28. Morocco Rabat Ville Train Station

    The view looking out from the Rabat Ville train station in Rabat's capital city.

  29. Morocco Rabat At Night

    A look down the main shopping artery in the old city of the Moroccan capital city of Rabat. On a nice night, the streets are packed as Rabatis and tourists stroll through the market picking up everything from the latest Western and Eastern fashions to brand new computer hardware and software. You literally can find anything, you just need to know where to look.

  30. Morocco Tagine

    Traveling around the world photographing Peace Corps volunteers for my book Making Peace with the World, Photographs of Peace Corps Volunteers, I was introduced to a lot of unfamiliar food. Some good, some bad and some horrible. I tried it all.    I discovered Morocco, where I photographed Peace Corps volunteers Rebecca Luhrs, Juan Camilo Mendez and Muriel Johnston, has wonderful cuisine. Because of its location as a crossroads for trade and for many cultures there is a cornucopia of choices ...

  31. Morocco Learning how to weave carpets

    While in Morocco I learned how to make two types of carpets.  This is a pile/knotted carpet, almost always woven in red, sometimes with black designs.  The looms were set up in women's homes so they could work whenever they had a chance.  The women sold the carpets in the local market, or kept them for their own use. This type of carpet would take several weeks to complete.

  32. Morocco Esteban Wakes Up

    Esteban was an awesome cat and probably accounted for a few thousand of my photos during my service. Here is he waking up.

  33. Morocco Biking to the lake

    One of my favorite activities while I was a volunteer was taking long bike trips with fellow volunteers and my host brothers.  This photo was taken on our first trip to a dam (and the resulting lake), three hard and hilly hours away from my village.  I had found the lake on Google Earth and we set out one day to find it, asking directions from the nomads that we encountered along the way walking through the scrubby hills with their vast herds of sheep.  

  34. Morocco Girls just want to play Soccer

    Before the spring of 2006, the soccer field in Tafraout, Morocco was boys' territory. Girls played informally near their homes or during gym class at school, but what they craved was to play with a real team on a real field.  On the first day of practice, 13 girls showed up, none of whom could hide their smiles as we kicked the boys off the field. "Sorry boys, the girls are practicing here today." The smiles continued as the team jogged a few laps, practiced drills and finally scrim...

  35. Morocco Cement Mixer

    Improving our village's irrigation channels meant bringing endless donkey-loads of cement, sand and rocks up to the construction site, mixing and pouring them by hand. The result: increased irrigation water for all of the fields in the village.

  36. Morocco Strawberry Boy

    A small boy buying strawberries at a small market in Marrakech.

  37. Morocco Through the Field

    Visiting my friend's site and talking a walk through the fields at sunset.

  38. Morocco Kite Surfing

    Kite surfing tournament in Essaouria, Morocco

  39. Morocco Sahara

    A camel trek in Merzuga in the south of Morocco. 

  40. Morocco Goat in an argan tree

    During my first year of teaching English in the provincial capital of Taza, I met my husband at the marche in Fez.  He was working for a French oil company and during my second year of service, he was transferred to the region of Essaouira. We conducted a long-distance romance which included visits back and forth.  When I visited him in the south, I saw goats like this one climbing in the argan trees to eat the nutty, olive-size fruit.  

  41. Morocco Cookbook

    A culinary record of recipes tested and digested au Maroc from the summer of '82 to the close of service in '83!

  42. Morocco Habiba

    My best friend in my village taught me more about what it was to be 'tough' than any other person I've met.  She was making a fire to bake some bread in her clay oven.

  43. Morocco Painting Houses

    A fellow volunteer's host mom painting her house deep Tazekka Mountain style.  Credit to Andrew Cyr/Bobbi Sandwich

  44. Morocco Wall

    Memories of booda tanks and half painted walls...

  45. Morocco Remember when...

    You were scared to not get gifts from Santa if you were bad?  Yeah, well, Morocco (in the deep Southern Region) stepped that up a notch.  Moroccan kids were scared by Goat Man if they misbehaved.  After Eid, Moroccans dressed in goat skins to frighten little kids straight.  Worked for me.  Credit to Mark Smith!

  46. Morocco Peace Corps Carnival

    Kids enjoy face painting, bobbing for apples and other joys of the American way at a carnival put on by volunteers during PST. Volunteer Antoine does his best to keep up with these crazy kids.

  47. Morocco Always Room for One More

    Volunteers around the world are no stranger to jamming as many people into public transportation as possible. Someone to the left of the driver? That's disconcerting.

  48. Morocco Celebrating Culture

    Two young Amazigh ladies show off the traditional dress of their region at an English language summer camp. Despite its small appearance, Morocco is as diverse in language and culture as it is in places to visit.

  49. Morocco It's my party

    Balloons and soda are worldwide symbols of a child's birthday. Here guests of the birthday girl patiently await the cutting of the cake and opening of the bottles.

  1. Morocco Chasing The Bus

    My second summer in Morocco I was traveling from my town to Rabat, the capital city, when my worst bus riding fear came true. The trip started out like any of the other multiple times I used the local bus service to get between towns.  The system is actually far superior to many of the public transportation systems across the US. In my town I could show up to the bus station and be guaranteed within 1/2 an hour to be headed in the direction I wanted to go.  Often this meant going 20 or ...

  2. Morocco The Ring

    I have been anticipating the past 24 hours because of the beginning of Ramadan. I decided that I would fast, at least in the beginning, for several reasons: first of all, it is such an important, national event, that the first thing people ask me when they see me – "are you fasting? Are you going to fast?"…a lot of pressure. Second, it is an experience that is really special to share with the community – stay up late, get up early (as in 4:30 in the morning early) to eat before the ...

  3. Morocco Reflections on Interdependence

    A few days ago I came home from my morning English class and cafe sitting time to a stream of water coming out of the spout connected to the roof. Hearing my knock, my 15-year-old host sister, Khaoula, stuck her head over the edge and told me to come up. I'm not usually invited up to the roof as this is normally the women's domain. I was greeted on the top step by a splash of water to the face and a happy family working together. The entire family was watching the man of the house, Hassan,...

  4. Morocco A Chanukah Story

    Disclaimer: I'm an American who happens to be Jewish. I served in a Muslim country and concealed my religious identity for the entirety of my Peace Corps service. The only people who knew about my background were the wonderful staff of Peace Corps Morocco, 90% of whom were both Moroccan and Muslim. Even my host family and close friends in Morocco still do not know about my Jewish heritage. While it did add another level of difficulty to my service, I did not want to needlessly complicat...

  5. Morocco The Nicest Man in Morocco

    The nicest man in Morocco works in a carpet shop in Azrou, in the Middle Atlas Mountains.  His father, Moha, owns it and is often there – he’ll go to the various souks and buy the one-of-a-kind antique rugs, he’ll purchase the rugs from the women or middlemen who come by with rugs to sell, he’ll take care of the important customers those who had been in before and were returning to close a big deal.  Abdou, the son, is in the shop all the time – it’s open from not-too-early in the morning unt...

  6. Morocco Who's in Charge Here?

    I knew it was coming.  Adam text messaged me on Wednesday to let me know that he would be coming in early Friday to start his Carte de Sejour process of with the Gendarmes of Goulmima.  I had agreed to help.  For people with more normal jobs being up-and-at-‘em at 8:00 am is no problem, but I grumbled when my phone vibrated four times and beeped at that (un)reasonable hour.  “In town.  meet at gendarmes?” read the text message. I tossed on a pair of shorts, t-shirt, baseball hat and show...

  7. Morocco Speaking Up

      “Arabs treat their women terribly…women’s rights in Arab countries are just non-existent…I would hate to be a woman there.” I overheard the gentleman while on a layover at the Chicago O’Hare airport in November 2004. Immediately, my stomach tensed and my blood pressure began to rise. Had I been sitting next to the man a year before, I doubt I would have reacted so adversely. But this year, I was heading home for a vacation from my first year as a Volunteer in Morocco. I had lived and breath...

  8. Morocco Camp is Camp the World Around

    One of the best experiences I had during my Small Business Development service was shortly after I was assigned to a site near Marrakech.  The Wonderful Unexpected. A friend in Youth Development co-chaired the spring break English immersion camp near the Algerian border, and asked if I would help.  I got permission from my manager and traveled for two long days and night to get there.  We taught English every morning and had "club" in the afternoons.  Since my Darija (Moroccan Arabi...

  9. Morocco Christmas Cake!!

    My back was acting up and it was bone chilling cold, both, outside and in my Moroccan host family’s home on Christmas day in 2006.  I hadn’t planned on doing anything to celebrate Christmas.  My host family was not home.  I was just hanging out with a hot water bottle and a book when a fellow PCV phoned to say that he was outside in the street---he had something for me.  Andrew (who created thirdgoal.org) lived an hour or two from me and had been in country a year longer than I.  I went outsi...

  10. Morocco A Humble Gift That Meant So Much

    We lived in Marrakesh, Morocco, a centuries old phantasmagorical city on the edge of the Sahara Desert in North Africa. Because of its snow-capped peaks from the High Atlas Mountains on the horizon,  the ubiquitous palm trees, and all the buildings painted the same shade of dusty pink, this town looked like a Hollywood movie set.   It was spring, 1972. We were Peace Corps English language teachers in local high schools. The singing group, Crosby Stills and Nash, of Woodstock fame, had made t...

  11. Morocco Moore Cooking With Joy

      Perhaps good food and Peace Corps seem antithetical, but in Morocco, a cultural crossroads, it was everywhere.  Whether fruit, vegetables or a plucked chicken from the market, most things were fresh and seasonally available in towns such as Taza or Essaouira.  And lacking such distractions as a telephone or TV, we had an incentive to imitate Julia Child's joie de la cuisine.   Those of us who were teachers in Morocco had the summer months off to work on special projects. My friend Joy and I...

  12. Morocco Spice Rack

    I met my husband while serving in the Peace Corps.  This poem is a celebration of the blending of our cultures and the wonderful diversity it brought to our lives.   Spice Rack   America’s melting pot implies mélange. Spice rack conjures up complexity: The tongue distinguishing textures And tastes – sweet, savory, Pleasantly piquant.                                         We were raised differently-- You: Moroccan, Arabic-speaking, Moslem; Me: American, English-speaking, Catholic, But food...

  13. Morocco Host Country: Peace Corps

    The cross-cultural exchange.  The foreign sea of oddity.  The languages, late nights, loneliness, thrills, aches and pure, heartwrenching love we all felt.  Those intensified emotions that only Peace Corps volunteers recognize in one another.  Give it a day, a week, a year...eventually, we know.  We all know.  We are a one of a kind community of wanderers.  A society of individuals built on the mutual understanding that the world can and will change if a few dedicated persons are willing to o...

  14. Morocco Women are Women- Everywhere

    In the small town where I was a volunteer, women wear long black synthetic sheets of fabric wrapped complicatedly around their bodies. The way it's wrapped creates a hood that can be easily pulled together around their mouthes and noses in the event that a man appears. These women are great mothers and superb caretakers. Everyday they clean their entire house, prepare four homemade meals for their families and even find time to pray five times. To the outsider, these women are uneducated and ...

Morocco

Morocco

Map of Morocco
status
Open
program dates
1963-Present
current volunteers
260
cumulative volunteers
4,177

Countdown to Weekly Contest Deadline!

“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.