1. Azerbaijan A Tale of Two Countries: Father and Son in the Peace Corps

    A Tale of Two Countries Father and Son in the Peace Corps By Mason Robbins, RPCV, Haiti 1999-2001, and Joel Robbins, RPCV, Azerbaijan, 2007-2009 Mason--We like to be able to boast to others, “Been there, done that.” Saying it makes us feel older, more experienced, wiser, more proud and condescending, maybe, when we are young. Saying it to my 63-year-old father makes me proud. Not proud of me, proud of him. My father served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Azerbaijan from 2007 ...

  2. Haiti A Tale of Two Countries: Father and Son in the Peace Corps

    A Tale of Two Countries Father and Son in the Peace Corps By Mason Robbins, RPCV, Haiti 1999-2001, and Joel Robbins, RPCV, Azerbaijan, 2007-2009 Mason--We like to be able to boast to others, “Been there, done that.” Saying it makes us feel older, more experienced, wiser, more proud and condescending, maybe, when we are young. Saying it to my 63-year-old father makes me proud. Not proud of me, proud of him. My father served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Azerbaijan from 2007 ...

  3. Azerbaijan Wide-Eyed

    The students in this elementary classroom were shocked to have an older PC volunteer and two of his Azeri college students help teach an English class. You gotta love these faces.

  4. Azerbaijan Novrus Celebration

    Students at Sheki Pedagogical Technicum celebrate the new growing season by dancing in traditional costumes around a bonfire. Zoroastrian traditions concerning fire, wind, water and earth govern this holiday.

  5. Bulgaria The Commute Forward

    “Vasilena?” “She travels, Gospozha!” “Djunait?  He doesn’t travel, does he?” “No, he lives in town.  He should be here!” 10A and I enacted this little ritual every time I took roll call, every day for my first three months as an English teacher at Gimnazia Tzar Simeon. “Ivanka?” “She travels!” “Kristina?” “Travels!” “Lyudmila?” “Travels!” Ms. Dunn’s Professional English Class tends to fall near the first or the last class period of the day.  Ro...

  6. Senegal "White person, your hair is so pretty. But, your body is dirty."

    For eighteen months, I lived in Senegal, West Africa.  For eighteen months, I listened to strangers, acquaintances and, at times, my closest friends refer to me as “toubab.” Toubab is the name given to white foreigners. Sometimes it’s used as an identifier.  I would hear my sister say over the phone, “You know, Bienta Toubab.”  Which was important because I was living in a family that had four women named Bienta. But it was still hard.  It was never, “Bienta Voluteer,” since I ...

  7. Mali One Love

    Casually embracing a new-found friend.

  8. Azerbaijan Ouch!

    I couldn't believe my eyes when I first saw this.  The person in the picture was my host mother who had a cold or something (I was to new to the country too understand what the deal what), but this was one remedy for it. 

  9. Bangladesh Bangladeshi Wedding.

    My host sister got all dolled up for her wedding.  Then completely freaked me out when she cried the whole time and screamed not to be taken from her family.  Only later did I learn that was all part of the ceremony.  When I saw her a week later, she and the new husband were so happy. 

  10. Costa Rica Young Moms

    I co-faciliated a gender workshops to a group of adolescent mothers. This is a picture I took while they were doing their group work.  Their children were with them...

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.