1. Azerbaijan Besh Barmaq Dagh

    Besh Barmaq Dagh, literally five-finger mountain, is one of the holiest places in the Caucasus range. A side view has five pinnacles that rise over a thousand feet above sea level. The front view shows the mosque and the trail to the top used by Muslim pilgrims who visit the dark rocks to pray.

  2. Nicaragua Somoto at Night

    My wife and I served in Somoto, Nicaragua as Community Health Promoters.  Somoto is a cowboy town 30 minutes from the border with Honduras.  It sits in a valley surrounded by bare mountains.  This photo was taken from our street corner.  It was almost impossible not to look up at the mountains and marvel at the site no matter the time of day, but this picture really gets to the heart of the beauty of Nicaragua.

  3. Bangladesh Getting there

    A rickshawalla pulls his customer to thier destination in the sweltering Bengali heat, a common sight in daily Bangladesh living...

  4. Thailand Thai-napped

    Volunteers were warned about how different the concept of time is in Thailand.  We were told things moved slower and at a more easy-going pace.  They didn’t tell us this also pertains to Thai notification. Many volunteers are finding out Thais aren’t keen on letting volunteers know when they’re about to go somewhere.  I’ve heard countless stories of a volunteer happily sitting in their room enjoying the quiet when a member of their host family will come in and say, “C’mon, it’s time to go,” ...

  5. Thailand Mai Pen Rai means "Never Mind"

    Mai Pen Rai means “Never Mind” Tim Hartigan TEFL/X, Thailand Group 95 (1989-1991) Questions borne of tragedy define generations of Americans. “Where were you when…Kennedy was shot?” was followed by “…the Challenger blew up?” and then “9/11 happened?” Buffalonians of a certain age also define ourselves by a much smaller traumatic question: “Where were you when the Bills lost their first Super Bowl?” I got to my Peace Corps site in rural northeastern Thailand in 1989. Part of my...

  6. Bangladesh Momentum

    I go back in time, to a surreal memory. The Peace Corps experience was nearly 6 years ago, but the experience still feels close. When I receive e-mails from friends and colleagues, I feel like I’m no longer the Adam they once knew.  After returning to the States – returning to the chaotic hum of other people’s lives -- I never fully reflected on my time in Bangladesh.  I can do that now. Walking down the street in Bangladesh workers yelled from behind, pushing large carts down unpave...

  7. East Timor Talk to a peace corps trainer: Giving up.

    It seems like my whole life was about sitting in training, itching and wishing I had something to eat.  This was a mixed blessing because the rash and the starving were the only things keeping the afternoon swelter from putting me to sleep.  Every so often I would tune back in to our shocks and sandal training coordinator to make sure I didn’t miss something I thought was relevant.  I was excited when I heard his normally hopeful voice drop an octave and become brittle.   I wait on these ...

  8. Nicaragua Mid-Service or Home Stretch

    I don’t know what has been going on lately, but it is difficult to find satisfaction in my life. I am not saying that I am squandering my life nor am I depressed, but I find that the original charm has worn off. I am accustomed to working in the schools and what I once saw as a novelty is ordinary. I have forded rivers, ridden horses, walked through cattle drives, chased pigs, and dealt with countless other experiences that would have seen alien in my former life. I am not bored, but I also ...

  9. Nicaragua Peace Corps Agricultural Training

    Learning to build terraces - the hard, sweaty way! 

  10. Nicaragua Peace Corps training

    Fellow volunteer Matt August and I teaching a class on forest ecosystems for the first time in Spanish after about 3 weeks of training. 

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.