1. Sierra Leone Going Home

    In September 1964 I arrived at Harford Secondary School for Girls in Moyamba, Sierra Leone where I was assigned as a Peace Corps Volunteer to teach music and French. I was 22 years old and had just graduated from college. This was my first time out of the country and my first “real” job. The two years at Harford were filled with learning, adventures, and wonderful new friends among the staff, students and townspeople. When my assignment was finished and I left in July 1966 I was in tear...

  2. Ukraine Ukrainka yogini

    My Ukrainian friends invited me to come to their exercise class.  A Russian woman had been there 10 years earlier and taught them an aerobics routine--they had been following it to a "T" for the past 10 YEARS!!!  That is how dedicated they are to being fit.  They asked me to introduce them to yoga and we began practicing together in a unheated gym--my yoga friends from the States sent us mats!  In the winter we could see our breath and our feet were blue.  The women brought their ki...

  3. Morocco Dress up

    Graduation day for the women at our local Nedi Niswi (Women's Center) is a great excuse for the important folk in town to come out, show their support and drink tea.  As part of the pre-certificate entertainment, many of the students from the center's preschool class performed a variety of songs for the onlookers.  This girl, strikingly beautiful dressed as a mini-Tashelheet bride, looks less than thrilled by her upcoming performance. 

  4. Morocco The Ring

    I have been anticipating the past 24 hours because of the beginning of Ramadan. I decided that I would fast, at least in the beginning, for several reasons: first of all, it is such an important, national event, that the first thing people ask me when they see me – "are you fasting? Are you going to fast?"…a lot of pressure. Second, it is an experience that is really special to share with the community – stay up late, get up early (as in 4:30 in the morning early) to eat before the ...

  5. Morocco A Woman On Her Own

    Rare amongst many rural Moroccans, this young unmarried woman traveled throughout the country selling her weaving thanks in part to the support of local Peace Corps Volunteers. As she was showing me how to weave this day we talked about  her experiences travelling without male accompaniment and how that has changed the way she is viewed in her small mountain community. 

  6. Senegal Wedding Entrance in Senegal

    The moment a woman enters her husband's house as a new bride is joyful and a huge step in Senegal.  They are greated by their new family and the women put down cloth in front of her to lead the way to her new home.  Her a close friend of mine, all dressed up for the day, enters her husband's home for the first time as his new wife.  After this a day of eating and celebrating began!

  7. Senegal Baby Naming Ceremony in Senegal

    Near the end of my service a young woman that I was close to had her first child.  Her her sister-in-law sits with the new born and the family elders during the naming ceremony.  I really saw this girl become a woman during my service and enjoyed seeing her grow!

  8. Morocco HIV/AIDS Awareness Campaign

    During my service, I worked with local community organizations on various campaigns. This is a picture from one of our HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns where we walked around the city passing out literature and talking with community members about the disease.

  9. Micronesia Katherine's Island

    I created a map for my friends and family to better visualize the small island on which I lived.

  10. Morocco Pouring Tea

    When my parents came to visit, my friends and colleagues treated them to delicious Moroccan tea at the youth center where I spent most of my time. Pictured are two local counterparts, Lahcen and Rachida.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.