1. Morocco Reflections on Interdependence

    A few days ago I came home from my morning English class and cafe sitting time to a stream of water coming out of the spout connected to the roof. Hearing my knock, my 15-year-old host sister, Khaoula, stuck her head over the edge and told me to come up. I'm not usually invited up to the roof as this is normally the women's domain. I was greeted on the top step by a splash of water to the face and a happy family working together. The entire family was watching the man of the house, Hassan,...

  2. Morocco HIV/AIDS Awareness Campaign

    During my service, I worked with local community organizations on various campaigns. This is a picture from one of our HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns where we walked around the city passing out literature and talking with community members about the disease.

  3. Morocco Pouring Tea

    When my parents came to visit, my friends and colleagues treated them to delicious Moroccan tea at the youth center where I spent most of my time. Pictured are two local counterparts, Lahcen and Rachida.

  4. Morocco Camp El Jadida Team Action News

    A product of the August-September, 2006 Camp El Jadida Journalism Club with Peace Corps Morocco & the Moroccan Ministry of Youth & Sport. Peace Corps Volunteers Andrew Meyerson and Moshay Simpson worked with nearly 30 students of the best journalism club ever assembled to complete Camp El Jadida Team Action News! Filming took place over the course of 2 weeks and complete video production took nearly 2 months. The news broadcast is 37 minutes in length. Copyright (C) 2006 Andrew Meyers...

  5. Morocco Look What We Caught!

    I was walking home one day from the Boys and Girls Club-type place where I worked, and some of the local kids ran up to me screaming, "Teacher, teacher! Look what we caught!." I was quite impressed. They're a lot smarter than I was at that age. Did you know how to catch birds when you were in elementary school? I made sure that the birds were released unharmed.

  6. Morocco What's a Tagine?

    Tagine, noun. A North African stew of spiced meat and vegetables prepared by slow cooking in a shallow earthenware cooking dish with a tall, conical lid. ORIGIN from Moroccan Arabic: frying pan.

  7. Morocco Essaouira Seagulls

    Essaouira is a gorgeous coastal city with a centuries old Portuguese fort that sits along Morocco's Atlantic coast and is about 90 minutes west of Marrakech. In my humble opinion, it's one of the most relaxing places in all of Morocco. The seagulls must think so too cause there's a whole lot of em.

  8. Morocco Moroccan Santa Claus

    For a Muslim country, this one was a bit surprising. I stopped in a big supermarket called Marjane one day when I was in Marrakech and right in front of the entrance was this guy dressed as Santa Claus. For about $5 you could take a picture with him and the animals and I just couldn't pass up the opportunity. Merry Christmas!

  9. Morocco A Chanukah Story

    Disclaimer: I'm an American who happens to be Jewish. I served in a Muslim country and concealed my religious identity for the entirety of my Peace Corps service. The only people who knew about my background were the wonderful staff of Peace Corps Morocco, 90% of whom were both Moroccan and Muslim. Even my host family and close friends in Morocco still do not know about my Jewish heritage. While it did add another level of difficulty to my service, I did not want to needlessly complicat...

  10. Morocco Marrakech Food Stalls

    American writer Paul Bowles said that without Jemaa L'fna, "Marrakech would be just another Moroccan city." The square, which is translated as the Mosque at the End of the World, comes alive at night as foreign and Moroccan tourists, not to mention your average Marrakchi, circles around snake charmers, fortune tellers, storytellers, musicians and magicians. They are fed by over 100 food stalls which operate from late afternoon well into the night, adding a smoky haze to one of the most unique...

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.