1. Mozambique Just a daily visit from my neighbors

    A big part of my Peace Corps experience is the downtime I have at home after I get done with all of my daily work activities. These 2 kids have become some of my closest friends in my neighborhood. They are outside my door in the morning, at lunchtime, and when I get back from doing activities in the community in the afternoon. They have taught me so many games, told me too many ghost stories, and never miss a chance to accompany me to the market (where they insist on holding my hands and hel...

  2. Peru Huayno Dance Off

    A little girl and I were having a dance-off to the native dance of the Peruvian Sierra called "Huayno" one rainy afternoon. The little girl won.

  3. Mongolia Mongolian Horse Race

    Typically children are the ones doing the horse racing, and this boy is no exception. Taken September 2010 in Baruun-Urt, Mongolia.

  4. Botswana Mokoro

    A mokoro is a traditional wooden boat, usually steered by a person standing at one end with a pole or long stick/branch.  They are used in the Okavango Delta and wetter areas in the north of Botswana as both transportation and tourism activity.

  5. Botswana Botswana Outdoor Seating

      My host family's yard was spiffied-up for my host-sister's summer wedding.  My host father was the kgosana, or headman, of our village.  His eldest daughter's wedding was a celebration that spared no expense or nicety.  Family and friends from both near and afar joined in a massive feast and dance that lasted 3 days, including the preparations that led up to the actual ceremony and post-ceremony party.   This is the seating area, constructed just for the occasion;  a blend of mud-earth and ...

  6. Peru Food or Pet?

    Guinea pig in Peru are raised as food, and lucky for me, I never had one as a pet. They are prepared normally by either frying them or preparing a stew with them. I prefer them fried, but only without the head. I don't like that part so much. They are normally served at special occasions, such as weddings, baptisms, school graduations, or various festivals in town.

  7. Peru Quesillo

    My neighbor invited me to watch her make cheese one afternoon. Everyday she collects milk from her neighbors, and in the afternoon, she puts all in a large vat and mixes it with the culture and salt. Then she fits it all into molds once it start curdling. This is called "Quesillo" and is eaten plain or on potatoes.

  8. Peru Knitting in the Sierra

    I was invited to a meeting in one of my communities only to find out that the meeting didn't start on time. The women, however, didn't seem phased, as they were all busy knitting and talking to one another.

  9. Peru Tamales & Friendship

    One of the local mothers groups called a "Comedor Popular" invited me to make "tamales" one day, one of the typical food made from corn in the andean area of Peru. What I thought was only going to be an hour tutorial, ended up being a full day affair, and not just about "tamales," but also getting to know the women. In the end, I ate lots of good food and made a few more friends.

  10. Peru Nueva Vida

    I live right next door to the health post and one night, our obstetrician came over to tell us that a woman was giving birth next door. I came over to see if I could help, and ended up witnessing my first birth. The baby was not breathing when it first came out, but my community partner skillfully and confidently brought the baby back to life.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.