1. Belize Father and Son

    This Rasta family lived next to a freind of mine on Caye Caulker. I asked the father if he'd let me take a piture of his son - he agreed but didn't want to look into the lense. The baby was so cute, he'd just come out of the bath. Years later someone saw this on my flickr account - turned out to be the child's aunt - she was delighted.

  2. Madagascar Vingt-Six Dance

    In celebration of Madagascar's Independence, the 26th of June ("vingt-six"), communities throw a large party.  In the South-East region, dances are performed in order to raise money for local groups.  Here men dance in a train as villagers come forward to contribute money at their feet. 

  3. Malawi Chapati Camaraderie

    Clothes cram up against clothes, up against walls, and people cram up against walls, and stalls, with stalls cramming up against stalls, and baskets, bags, and babies fill in the spaces between. After a venture past baskets, bags, and babies, and a careful avoidance of mysterious most likely toxic puddles, one may happen upon the Chapati Lady in the Mzuzu market. This morning for breakfast I had two chapati, two eggs, shredded cabbage salad with tomato, and chips all pleasantly coated in grea...

  4. Senegal Curiosity

    Leyna Ba can't resist taking a closer look at the camera

  5. Senegal Tangana

    There are very few things that could get me to step out of the brightly lit miniature America known as the Peace Corps regional house onto the dark sketchy streets of Kaolack at night, but freshly fried eggs and potatoes is one of them. Let me paint for you a picture of how I went about acquiring my dinner last night. Stepping out of the front door of the regional house feels a bit like stepping onto another planet. Headlights wink through a haze of dust hanging in the air, silhouetted f...

  6. El Salvador Los Robles (The Oaks)

    The Robles family's love radiated through their smiles and interactions. On holidays, we sometimes explored places off the beaten path. During a hike in La Montañona, it struck me that the family was as solid as a tree. In this portrait, I joined the Robles family with their cousin, the Oak. Valentin was a great organic farmer and counterpart. We collaborated on projects and complemented each others' work. I thank Mother Earth and the Peace Corps for uniting me with this family; they are lik...

  7. El Salvador The Culture of Hospitality

    At home, the homeless are almost always strangers to be avoided, but in El Salvador, as is probably true of other developing countries, the homeless are friends and neighbors to be cared for. Whenever I walked the dirt paths of my community, I would often come across a frail elderly woman with a toddler. I was amazed that the toddler was made to walk so much, and that the woman spent little time at home. I assumed the lady liked to chotiar, visit her friends. One day, after expressi...

  8. Fiji meke ni yaqona

    This was part of a ceremony to officially honor the opening of the Ra provincial meeting house- a building that took many years to fundraise and build. cheif guest of the day was then Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase (who was ousted in Fiji's 4th coup later that same year). In any case, native Fijians love a good celebration and they take their local protocal very seriously, especially with such an important guest. These local men are dressed in traditional leaf skirts and slathered in coconut ...

  9. Senegal Radio

    This guy was never without his trusty, rusty old radio.  He's enjoying a relaxing moment under the shade structure with his favorite tunes.

  10. Senegal Mangrove Replanting - With help from PC Washington!

    PCVs came from around the region to help with a Mangrove Replanting Day in Sokone, Senegal on August 18th, 2009.  We were fortunate to have the Acting Director of Congressional Relations from Peace Corps Washington, Suzie Carroll, join us!  Pictured: young Senegalese boy, PCV Rithvik Balakrishnan, and Suzie Carrol

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.