1. Cameroon Thing Things You Don't Realize...

    … when you have everything. Did you ever realize how dirty you get when you don’t have an actual shower? We are in the midst of dry season here and water is a more precious commodity than ever. While I am lucky and have gotten in good with neighbor kids who come to fetch water for me daily, the supply is still limited. As a result, bucket-bathing daily has become a luxury. That, and it’s really just a huge pain in the rear end. No worries, I have plentifu...

  2. Cameroon Out of Africa

    Sitting at Philadelphia International airport waiting for my connecting flight to St. Louis and having a hard time believing that I am finally back in the USA, after 26 months. The layover in Brussels went smoothly. I parted ways with Laura who traveled with me from Yaoundé. We grabbed a Caramel Macchiato at Starbucks before boarding our respective flights. It felt very correct. I didn’t have the panic feelings that I encountered when landing in Paris last summer. This was a good sign, ...

  3. Cameroon Books For Cameroon

    A proud moment when the 40-foot container carrying 23,000+ books donated by Books For Africa for the Books For Cameroon project arrived in my provinical capital.

  4. Chile Peace Corps Was The Start Of A Long Road

    I arrived in Chile in September of 1966, in the middle of the annual Independence Day celebrations.  My group was trained in Albuquerque, NM, to work with credit co-operatives.  My first post was the town of Quillota, a quiet agricultural town about 80 miles from Santiago, the capital. My first months were spent making tentative attempts at doing my job, reading books from my book locker, riding my bicycle around town, and taking the train to the port of Valparaiso to take Spanish lessons an...

  5. Benin The Fan Milk Man

    This photo goes along with my attached story

  6. Benin Dropping the Fan Milk Man

                 I am an avid road cyclist have ridden as much as 105 miles in day, and when I was racing, I rode as much as 5,000 miles in a year.  I like to think that I can ride pretty fast.  In Benin Peace Corps gave all volunteers a fairly nice Trek mountain bike to use to get around on since we didn’t have a motorcycle or a car.  It was so hot in Benin that I couldn’t really enjoy riding for exercise, so I was a little out of shape.  I was still riding a lot for transportation purposes, so ...

  7. Uzbekistan Doppas

    Uzbekistan is one of those “stan” countries, a part of the former Soviet Union, a predominantly Muslim country with legendary cities of Samarkand and Bukhara, but it had been practically unvisited by tourists for over a hundred years. I had no idea what to expect there as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and nobody could tell me much either. At age 56, I had traveled the globe extensively on business and pleasure, and I felt up to anything. Besides, as it turned out, there really was no way that...

  8. Vanuatu Bae yu go wea?

    I had the amazing and humbling honor to be asked by my high school to speak at their 2011 Commencement. My reflection and experiences are based on my Peace Corps service. Here is the transcript.   Principal Harrington, Teachers, members of the School Board, special guests, parents and especially the 2011 graduates, thank you for this honor to speak to you today. Wow, this is weird I just gave a talk like this to a group of students a few months ago…it was in a tiny village thousands of mile...

  9. Vanuatu A Basket for Change

      What started out as workshops for women to come together, sew and share stories evolved into A Basket for Change.  55 women from Paama along with the help of two returned Peace Corps volunteers Amy Chan & Brianna Russell started “A Basket for Change” (ABC) where they have created a new style of bag or basket as Ni-Vanuatu call them using cotton material printed with Vanuatu’s vibrant colors and island motif.  www.abasketforchange.org

  10. Madagascar Famadiahana - Turning of the Dead

    One of the interesting cultural events I have been privileged to witness during my Peace Corps service in Madagascar. One of the ways malagasy honor their ancestors. Each year ancestors' bodies are removed from the family tomb and then rewrapped in silk cloth. Like any good party, heavy drinking, singing and dancing is also involved. Reminded me of university football games --- people having a good time drinking, tossing up friends for every touchdown... except not so much in this case. Just ...

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.