1. Moldova Transporation in Moldova: Riding and elevator

    Transportation can be quirky and creepy here in Moldova. One of the scariest parts of Moldovan transportation infrastructure is the Elevator or Lift. Enjoy our ride from the 1st to the 14th floor.

  2. Moldova Kids in Peresecina, Orhei, Moldova

    My host partner's goat had babies in Peresecina, Moldova! I was given the honor of naming the new babies and so the little brown girl is named Cinnamon and the boy is Billy Bob. Apparently you are not supposed to give animals human names because it is not a good omen. The animals are typically named for the day they are born on. However, I convinced my partner and her neighbor that it was okay to use American pet names and that in fact this might be a really good omen.

  3. Moldova Transporation in Moldova: Trolleybus

    This is yet another video in my transportation in Moldova series. Riding the trolleybus certainly is cheap (only 2 lei) and definitely a greener way of getting around the three biggest cities in Moldova (Chisinau, Balti and Cahul) it still isn't entirely carbon free but we can always hope for that day.

  4. Moldova Transportation in Moldova: Rutiera

    My friend Sarah and I traveling from the town of Floresti to Balti for jewelry club supplies on the Monday before International Women's Day, March 7, 2011.

  5. Moldova Breakfast with Maria

    One of my good friends in my village is the hairdresser who has an office or salon in the same building where my office is. She is the cutest lady and I enjoy our frequent conversations and moments giggling over a cup of tea and a few biscuits or cookies. She is always asking me questions, inquiring about my family, life in the USA and how to use a computer better. I even taught her to play "Heart and Soul" on the piano. Maria has really helped me to get through my service...

  6. Moldova Happy Memorial Easter!

    In Moldova we celebrate not only Eastern Orthodox Easter but one week later we also go to the cemetery for Memorial Easter.  We bring with us sweets, breads, chocolates, colored eggs and wine to be blessed and eaten in honor of the souls of the deceased.

  7. Niger Streets of Lido

    THE STREETS OF LIDO Joel Neuberg July 16, 2011   At the end of the 1968 rainy season, I moved into the recently abandoned Jack Saunders residence in Lido, Niger. Jack abandoned the house, a two-room adobe brick thatch-roofed African hut with a mud floor, because he was extending for a third year to ensure the success of his plan to bring democracy and a form of literacy to the peanut markets of the farmers’ cooperatives in our part of West Africa. He had a car, a little French Deux Ch...

  8. Niger Tombola

    TOMBOLA NATIONAL Joel Neuberg July 15, 2011   The California Lottery is, of course, a tax on the poor (and foolish and desperate) to benefit the rich (and the would-be-richer), but the taxers in Cal and Texas could learn a lot from their counterparts in the Republic of Niger of the 1960s. The national lottery in Niger (Tombola National) had a simple system for raising revenue, selling all the tickets it prints, and assuring nationwide income from people who have even less hope of winn...

  9. Niger Comes A Horseman

    COMES A HORSEMAN Joel Neuberg July 11, 2011   I once owned three horses. When I arrived to begin two years service as a Peace Corps volunteer in the village of Guecheme, Niger (West Africa) in the summer of 1967, I discovered I had inherited a house, a houseboy, and a horse. The house was a substantial mud brick structure with a cement floor and a corrugated iron roof. The downside to the house was that it was a school building about a quarter mile from the main village in a low lyi...

  10. El Salvador Making Fertilizer

    My friends and fellow youth group members excited about making organic fertilizer for the first time!

Countdown to Weekly Contest Deadline!

“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.