1. Micronesia Return To Past

    On my first trip to Walung with the Yata Youth Group (where I did all my singing) I found myself awake in the early morning, but not nearly before the cooks or those feeding the pigs or the grandmothers.  As I walked on the beach I came across this canoe floating beside modern outboard motor fishing boats.  Before the picture was taken I watched a young man paddle the boat into the harbor and unload his nights worth of spear fishing catch.

  2. Micronesia bananas and coconuts

    This is one of my favorite photos from my two Micronesian years, it was taken from inside a tiny fruit stand at my Uncle Natsuo's house where I often bought the pictured produce.  

  3. Micronesia sunrise from a boat

    The tides again determined our approach to Walung.  Our silent, dark departure from Tafunsak marina allowed a sunrise approach to a community still attuned with non-electrical rhythms.  

  4. Fiji Farewell to Fiji

    Here are some of the boys that took me on a picnic during my last days in my Fijian village on the island of Vanua Levu.  In front of the boys is the tub of seafood we enjoyed and the root crops spread in front of them.

  5. Fiji Farewell to Fiji

    Fijians love to eat.  Fijians also love to farewell.  It was only natural that the two would be combined as my close of service neared.  For the last two weeks I was in my village I did nothing but eat my way around the tikina (district).  One of the most memorable feasts came on my last Wednesday, a day I had hoped would find us in the deep ocean, under a bright hot sun, gazing into water so blue it made the sky pale in comparison.  Instead, as happens to all good plans during Peace Corps, ...

  6. Vanuatu Pikinini blong Pentecost

    My Peace Corps experience would have been great without the little ones in this video, but they made it AMAZING! I was a youth development volunteer in the village of Abwatuntora, on the island of Pentecost. Mina, Aniva, Matai and Josep lived with me on a peninsula called Lapawariri. When I took this video, I had just started learning Raga, the language of north Pentecost, so my Bislama suffered a bit. You can hear them speaking Raga behind the camera, which I had to hold, because they wouldn...

  7. Micronesia Nephews and My House

    Robby, pictured here are 3 months, was born to my host sister during my service.  Baby rearing is communal in Kosrae, usually I was responsible for the early mornings, when Robby and I would walk the beach as the sun rose.  In the background you can see our tin roofed house and well swept lawn.  The room all the way on the left, and the only one with screens, is mine.

  8. Micronesia Awaiting... Fate

    This pig found a cool spot to rest before its participation in a cooking demonstration at the Pacific Island Bilingual Bicultural Association conference on Kosrae in June 2007.

  9. Micronesia Halloween in the tropics

    Because we all had those times we needed a little (or big) taste of home and such comfortable memories, the PCVs on Kosrae always had a Halloween party.  Complete with long thought-out costumes.  And generally bad beer.   

  10. Micronesia Meeting Worlds

    In July 2006 my United States parents journeyed the thousands of miles and days of cramped airplanes to the tropical heat of Kosrae.  Here my best friend Betra and my host sister Shiela wait at the open walled airport for a glimpse of Ninac and Pahpah fashfash (white mom and dad).  The visit resulted in much sharing of clothing and many laughs.  

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.