1. Guyana Weaving Basket

    Even in our remote, small Amerindian village, many young people don't know how to do all the traditional skills. As a part of a training program to prevent human trafficking amoung the youth, building pride in local culture is emphasized by teaching youth how to weave baskets from local palm and how to shoot bow and arrow. Here, one youth who already knew how to weave a basket helps another who is just learning. 

  2. Brazil Losing It in Brazil

    When I was in Brazil, there was a joke among Peace Corps Volunteers: Why did male volunteers lose weight? Because they cooked for themselves. Why did female Volunteers gain weight? Because they cooked for themselves. But, against odds, I lost approximately 30 pounds over the two years I lived in Brazil. I have several explanations for this. 1. First, I walked everywhere. I had no car or bike in Glória. In larger cities, I caught a bus only when I had to travel more than a few miles....

  3. Guyana Learning Resource Centre

    After working hard to raise money through PCPP, I was able to attain supplies and resources for our village's LRC. One of the favorites amoung the children was "Memory", a matching game with pictures of dinosaurs. Here, 2 sisters test their memory as we played together. 

  4. Guyana School Graduation

    This is one of Aishalton's primary school students during his graduation.  The gowns are made by the child's family.

  5. Peru Clean Hands!

    After a handwashing activity my elementary school kids were so proud of their clean hands and fingernails.

  6. Brazil The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Cowboys in Glória

      Cowboys: Every Friday, late in the afternoon, local cowboys sauntered into town on their horses, driving a small herd of cattle in front of them. In Brazil, the cowboys were vaqueiros, but in Glória, they were usually called gauchos.   The gauchos who drove their cattle past our house on a dusty dirt road wore leather chaps and leather jackets. They often had holsters with guns strapped to their thighs and dangerous-looking knifes in leather sheaths on their belts. Their leather gaucho hat...

  7. Paraguay La Mandarina

      My site is perched on a hill next to the last bit of Paraguay’s Upper Parana jungle.  Twenty-five years ago, it consisted of little more than a handful of indigenous families surrounded by barely-accessible roads and intimidating rainforest, thick as a howler monkey’s beard.  From the air, the forest would have resembled distant ruffled moss, polka-dotted pink and yellow by blooming Tajy trees.  Today, the land is mostly red dirt.  Bald. Deforested.  Over the decades, my site transformed in...

  8. Guyana Handprint

    Using the juice from a local seed called Annato, Amerinidans are able to create a type of body paint used in special celebrations highlighting their culture.   Here a hand provides a perfect way of decorating.

  9. Guyana Mash Cake

    Different villages from the surrounding area came in to participate in the Mashrimani celebrations including this young girl who dressed up in a birthday cake. Happy birthday Guyana!

  10. Paraguay T-ray to go

    The popular tea, terere, in the ubiquitous leather-covered thermos and taken everywhere in the heat of summer.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.