1. Paraguay How I Learned Guarani

     @font-face { font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } The Peace Corps is not a travel agency.  I sat nervously in the recruiter’s office, exhausted from the two-hour interview, when I was asked the golden question.  “What part of the world would y...

  2. Guyana Smoke Ceremony

    Before the Deep South Games that are held every August, the audience gets to participate in a smoke ceremony.  

  3. Guyana Bucking Bronco

    Cattle wrangling is a huge part of the Rupununi Savannah.  To highlight some of the talents of the vaqueiro or cowboy, a Rodeo is held every Easter.   These events usually hold horse riding, bull riding, and also rope technique. This event also shows how popular US culture has carried over into my area.

  4. Guyana Smiles

    Gigantic smiles from two nursery students in a remote Amerindian village in Guyana. I caught them during playtime!

  5. Guyana Renelle

    A young girl participates in the local cultural group which highlights song and dance that has been a part of Amerindian culture and is being passed down from generation to generation.   Don't let her cute demeanor let your guard down!  Renelle is a very spirited child and I have come to really enjoy her pokes and prods as well as all of her questions about myself, my wife, and what we are doing there. 

  6. Guyana I Sexed a Caiman

    Made you look, huh? Before you jump to any lewd conclusions, I'll clear the air and inform you that it simply means I determined the sex of a caiman, or black caiman (melanosuchus niger), one species of alligators found here in the Rupununi, the region that makes up the southern third of Guyana. The largest, actually. Caiman House, HQ for the NGO I’m working with, gets its name from studying the black caiman here. One of the several projects CH is involved in is the Caiman Project, where they...

  7. Guyana Basket Weaving

    Onesimus, strong in traditional Amerindian skills, teaches Sonia, who is very shy, to weave a basket from an ite palm leaf. They are learning as a part of a young adult training to give them skills and confidence. 

  8. Guyana Basket Weaving

    Onesimus, strong in traditional Amerindian skills, teaches Sonia, who is very shy, to weave a basket from an ite palm leaf. They are learning as a part of a young adult training to give them skills and confidence. 

  9. Guyana Helping Hands

    Traditional handicraft is a huge part of our Amerindian village's culture and identity.  Hats, fans, necklaces, baskets, a backpack of sorts called a Warshi, and other items are made from the surrounding resources.  They use certain vines, grasses, and the leaves of the Ite' Palm to create the items and then use them till they degrade to the point that they can't use them anymore. In trying to preserve part of their culture, older members of the community hold small seminars and invite the yo...

  10. Guyana Hand Print

    Amerindians in the Rupununi of Guyana hold cultural events that highlight dance and music that is being passed down amongst 'culture groups'.  Here a young boy has been painted with a homemade paint made from the Anatto plant - it bears spiky pods that contains seeds coated in a red paint.  Amerindians use this paint to decorate themselves with designs and whatever else they can come up with!  

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.