1. Jordan Standing alone, among many...

    One of the things the young women and I would do in my village was take walks through the rock fields. Away from the shabob (boys) we would sing and dance, gossip and laugh- really LOUD!

  2. Morocco Cement Mixer

    Improving our village's irrigation channels meant bringing endless donkey-loads of cement, sand and rocks up to the construction site, mixing and pouring them by hand. The result: increased irrigation water for all of the fields in the village.

  3. Morocco A Humble Gift That Meant So Much

    We lived in Marrakesh, Morocco, a centuries old phantasmagorical city on the edge of the Sahara Desert in North Africa. Because of its snow-capped peaks from the High Atlas Mountains on the horizon,  the ubiquitous palm trees, and all the buildings painted the same shade of dusty pink, this town looked like a Hollywood movie set.   It was spring, 1972. We were Peace Corps English language teachers in local high schools. The singing group, Crosby Stills and Nash, of Woodstock fame, had made t...

  4. Morocco Girls just want to play Soccer

    Before the spring of 2006, the soccer field in Tafraout, Morocco was boys' territory. Girls played informally near their homes or during gym class at school, but what they craved was to play with a real team on a real field.  On the first day of practice, 13 girls showed up, none of whom could hide their smiles as we kicked the boys off the field. "Sorry boys, the girls are practicing here today." The smiles continued as the team jogged a few laps, practiced drills and finally scrim...

  5. Morocco Biking to the lake

    One of my favorite activities while I was a volunteer was taking long bike trips with fellow volunteers and my host brothers.  This photo was taken on our first trip to a dam (and the resulting lake), three hard and hilly hours away from my village.  I had found the lake on Google Earth and we set out one day to find it, asking directions from the nomads that we encountered along the way walking through the scrubby hills with their vast herds of sheep.  

  6. Iran My landlord

    My landlord was a haji originally from Yazd.  He was also the nafti, meaning he sold kerosene in an open vat on the first floor. The smell of kerosene permeated my apartment. i would carry twelve liters of kerosene up three flights of stairs to my apartment.  It had an ab o bargh number , i.e., water and electricity number, but no street address number since it had failed to pass the licensing inspection for safety.  The bricks were of low grade with insufficient cement and too much granualr ...

  7. Morocco Esteban Wakes Up

    Esteban was an awesome cat and probably accounted for a few thousand of my photos during my service. Here is he waking up.

  8. Yemen Shopping at the mall Yemen 1976

    1976 Shopping in "Souk", Covered Marketplace, near Mokha, Yemen where Mokha coffee was originally exported to Europe in 17th century.

  9. Morocco Learning how to weave carpets

    While in Morocco I learned how to make two types of carpets.  This is a pile/knotted carpet, almost always woven in red, sometimes with black designs.  The looms were set up in women's homes so they could work whenever they had a chance.  The women sold the carpets in the local market, or kept them for their own use. This type of carpet would take several weeks to complete.

  10. Yemen The World is a Funny Place

    We were invited to a celebration luncheon at a tiny village in Northern Yemen near the Saudi Arabian border. It was 1976, and some civil engineer Peace Corps volunteers had just completed building a concrete rain water catch basin to improve this village’s clean water supply. There were 30 people lounging on pillows in a circle on the floor of the village sheikh’s sumptuous living room in this expansive mud and stone home. He wanted to show us his gratitude, and a feast of roasted lamb, ...

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.