1. Costa Rica Guava

    This fruit is called 'guayaba' in Spanish and my youth group uses it for their business. They created a small business called GUAITFRUIT which produces and sells jelly in the community.  I took this pic during their production process.

  2. Costa Rica Dinner Date

    Going out for dinner has a different meaning in this particlular situation.  Fishing is a large part of the culture here in Tortuguero, Costa Rica.

  3. Costa Rica Digging a Well

    Thirsty? Start digging! 

  4. Costa Rica Hand Washing Fun

    Children of the Nutrition and Education Center in the community of Barbacoas de Puriscal enjoy washing their hands before lunch.

  5. Costa Rica All Smiles In Tortuguero

    The children of Tortuguero share a laugh with each other

  6. Costa Rica Making Lomos

    Our local community Children's Nutrition and Education Center of Barbacoas de Puriscal made "lomos" one of Costa Rica's many delicious typical foods.

  7. Costa Rica Children of the CEN

    Students from my community Barbacoas de Puriscal pose for a picture at the Children's Nutirtion and Education Center

  8. Costa Rica Holy Week!

    During holy week, it's a tradition in rural Costa Rica to make corn-based products (pastries) that would accompany a usual coffee break during the day.  This one is one of my favorite pictures and they are called rosquillas; perfectly shaped minidonut-looking things made with lots of cheese.

  9. Costa Rica Pateando Barro

    Local artesan of Guaitil de Santa Cruz is kicking a mix of clay, iguana's sand and water as the third step of the preparation process to produce handmade Chorotega pottery.

  10. Costa Rica Pies de B

    Kicking clay is one of the steps artesans take as part of the pottery-making process. In a big mantel, you mix 100% with 50% of iguana's sand and water.  Step, kick, step until consistency is adequacte to make pottery. I had the opportunity to do it and it felt amazing! Hardwork indeed.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.