1. Mongolia Beginning Summer Camp

    Peace Corps Volunteer Todd Waite looks out on our lake in Dariganga before teaching three weeks of summer camp

  2. Guatemala Jesus Cristo

      One great thing about the Peace Corps is the opportunity it affords to meet amazing people, both host country nationals and other Peace Corps volunteers. Ask any volunteer what enabled them to endure the taxing environments and situations they find themselves in over the course of two years of service, and I’d bet most would say, “the people.” I don’t know how I could have ridden this emotional roller coaster this long without my fellow volunteers. We grow together, celebrate our gains toge...

  3. Mongolia The Story of My Service

    Sometimes a story is so good that I don’t want it to end. As the pages in my right hand get lighter, I might even flip back a few chapters to try and enjoy it again—to remember what just happened and maybe catch something I missed. For whatever reason, I brought that blue invitation packet with me across the ocean, the same one every Volunteer gets in the mail with “Peace Corps invites you to serve” printed on the front. It’s been a long time since I opened it, more than two years. A c...

  4. Mongolia Close of Service

    Close of Service Conference for our M19 Group as we finished our service in Mongolia.

  5. Mongolia Swearing In Ceremony

    Tunga and I during the beginning of my third year as a PCVL at the 2010 Swearing In Ceremony for our M21 Volunteers.

  6. Guatemala Let's Talk About Sex, Baby.

    I was getting blank stares from a sea of uniformed fifteen-year-olds as I fumbled through explaining how AIDS doesn’t actually kill an infected person- opportunistic infections are what inevitably bring about the demise of the patient. It was a struggle. I felt like I was explaining the process well but I didn’t get a single reassuring nod from the crowd. I hesitated and then turned to my counterpart for the HIV/AIDS training I was conducting for help. In previous sessions he was quick to jum...

  7. Guatemala Blackout

    I am writing this using a battery powered lantern that Dad sent me in one of his many packages. I usually reserve this light for night time showering. The electricity has been out for the past hour so it's working overtime tonight. Luckily, I still have 2 hours 29 minutes left on my Mac battery and my internet runs through the cell tower. We get blackouts about five times a week during the rainy season. It's not raining right now, so I am not sure what caused it this time. To be honest, thoug...

  8. South Africa A Bear of a Laundry Day

    Our 6 year-old host brother's attempt at hanging out the laundry to dry...

  9. Mali Is this in America?

    Shaka, a five year old that lives in my concession. Number one asked question of all time, is _______ in America? It could be anything, a cat, chair, sandal, rice, etc. This time he asked if there is a machine like this one in America, I did not know for sure, so I just said there are machines and maybe one in America is the same.

  10. Mali Piece of Meat

    I eat with my host family for lunch and dinner. I have to say I am a very lucky volunteer, because my family cooks very well. Most meals are served with some meat or fish and at the end my host mother divides it up so every one gets a portion. One day after I finished lunch and gave my blessings of thanks, I walked into my hut to take a multi-vitamin. Seconds later, five-year old, Shaka flies by my door screaming and crying; immiediately I think oh no someone is going to hit him. I walk outsi...

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.