1. Micronesia Halloween in the tropics

    Because we all had those times we needed a little (or big) taste of home and such comfortable memories, the PCVs on Kosrae always had a Halloween party.  Complete with long thought-out costumes.  And generally bad beer.   

  2. Micronesia Meeting Worlds

    In July 2006 my United States parents journeyed the thousands of miles and days of cramped airplanes to the tropical heat of Kosrae.  Here my best friend Betra and my host sister Shiela wait at the open walled airport for a glimpse of Ninac and Pahpah fashfash (white mom and dad).  The visit resulted in much sharing of clothing and many laughs.  

  3. Morocco End of Market Day

    I shot this photo in my site near the end of my service just as the market day was coming to a close.

  4. Morocco The Ring

    I have been anticipating the past 24 hours because of the beginning of Ramadan. I decided that I would fast, at least in the beginning, for several reasons: first of all, it is such an important, national event, that the first thing people ask me when they see me – "are you fasting? Are you going to fast?"…a lot of pressure. Second, it is an experience that is really special to share with the community – stay up late, get up early (as in 4:30 in the morning early) to eat before the ...

  5. Morocco Chasing The Bus

    My second summer in Morocco I was traveling from my town to Rabat, the capital city, when my worst bus riding fear came true. The trip started out like any of the other multiple times I used the local bus service to get between towns.  The system is actually far superior to many of the public transportation systems across the US. In my town I could show up to the bus station and be guaranteed within 1/2 an hour to be headed in the direction I wanted to go.  Often this meant going 20 or ...

  6. Morocco A Woman On Her Own

    Rare amongst many rural Moroccans, this young unmarried woman traveled throughout the country selling her weaving thanks in part to the support of local Peace Corps Volunteers. As she was showing me how to weave this day we talked about  her experiences travelling without male accompaniment and how that has changed the way she is viewed in her small mountain community. 

  7. Senegal Now that's how you make juice!

    While in Senegal I worked with a local juice and jelly business owned by a group of young women.  Through a Peace Corps Partnership Program grant I worked with them to receive their liscense to sell jucie products legally in Senegal.  We also purchased this HUGE cooking pot to pasteurize their juice and were very proud of it!    

  8. Senegal Good-byes After Two Years

    During my service as a Small Enterprise Development (SED) Volunteer in Kaffrine, Senegal I taught a weekly bussines class at a local vocational school for young women.  My course, which I taught in French and Wolof in conjunction with my Senegalese counterpart, was a nice addition to their curriculum and a great way to get to know some amazing young women.  Here I am at the end of my service saying good-bye to them.

  9. Senegal Wedding Entrance in Senegal

    The moment a woman enters her husband's house as a new bride is joyful and a huge step in Senegal.  They are greated by their new family and the women put down cloth in front of her to lead the way to her new home.  Her a close friend of mine, all dressed up for the day, enters her husband's home for the first time as his new wife.  After this a day of eating and celebrating began!

  10. Senegal Baby Naming Ceremony in Senegal

    Near the end of my service a young woman that I was close to had her first child.  Her her sister-in-law sits with the new born and the family elders during the naming ceremony.  I really saw this girl become a woman during my service and enjoyed seeing her grow!

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.