1. Malawi training like cheerleaders

    PCV training in Malawi 1991.

  2. Malawi monkey see monkey do

    On Lake Malawi, there was a place called Cape McClear. On this Cape, there is a place called Monkey Bay. I would escape from work and go stay in a hut to watch the beautiful sunsets. The locals would make me pancakes and bananas for breakfast. The monkeys would come and grab the banana peels, grab the fruit out of the tourists hands. and play on the steps. They saw no evil, heard no evil, and spoke no evil.

  3. Togo Mom and her poster child for child weighings

    When we first met, I thought this beautiful Fulani mother's young child would die of malnutrition. He was so severely underweight and malnourished that his weight was similar to children a full year younger than he. The health volunteers and I biked to her farm community every month during the dry season to hang a Salter scale from the branch of a tree and weigh all the children. We counseled this mom on enriched porridge, organized a demonstration to prepare the porridge with the farm women,...

  4. Togo Nothing like fresh pork

    Meat was a very rare delicacy in my village Affem Kabye but on very special occasions I would join my health counterpart in a pig slaughter and then enjoy a delectable meal eaten with his beautiful wife and his 8 bubbly, contagiously happy children. At one point during my service an entire pick up truck full of PCVs came to visit because they heard we were slaughtering a pig and preparing spicy peanut sauce. Oh c'est bon!

  5. Togo Les gamins

    What's not to love about these adorable kids? When I first arrived in the village they would sing the "Yovo" song to me Yovo yovo bon soir (white person white person good evening) Ca va bien Merci Once we got to know each other, they would sing my name "Naka" and give me "high fives." That sure beats the Yovo song

  6. Togo Naka pounding fufu in her village Affem Kabye, Togo

    I particularly love this photo because fufu was and still is my favorite Togolese delicacy and because Kabye take pride in their enormous African yams. Fufu preparation is quite labor intensive but the time and effort of boiling and pounding the African yams is well worth the wait and the physical labor. My favorite sauce is made with fresh pork, ground peanuts and 'sesame' and hot peppers. Add a little tchouk (homemade millet beer) and eat it under a mango tree

  7. Togo Sacrificial dog as part of Habiye male coming-of-age events

    Habiye is the male coming of age ceremony that takes place every five years during which 'generations' of boys become men in the eyes of their family and friends. Some of the events include dancing wearing hats made of home-made baskets covered with cow dung and decorated with goat hair; wrestling; chasing down a dog, slaughtering it, cooking it and eating it; and learning to be a Kabiye man. In the Kabye culture, only men who have participated in these rites of passage can eat dog. This even...

  8. Togo PCV Naka dancing Kamou in Affem Kabye, Togo

    Here I am dancing Kamou, the end of the harvest dance, with my health counterparts Henou (male community health volunteer) and Adjoua (female community health volunteer and traditional birth attendant). Kamou means drum. We dance counterclock-wise around the drum, swinging tree branches, and keeping the beat with ring-like metal castenettes. In Affem Kabye each village "quartier" (neighborhood) hosts a Kamou during which all the residents wear an outift using a pagne (African print ...

  9. Togo Habiye in Affem Kabye, Togo

    Habiye is the male coming of age ceremony that takes place every five years during which 'generations' of boys become men in the eyes of their family and friends. Some of the events include dancing wearing hats made of home-made baskets covered with cow dung and decorated with goat hair; wrestling; chasing down a dog, slaughtering it, cooking it and eating it; and learning to be a Kabiye man.

  10. Togo Cotton harvest in Affem Kabye

    The Kabye people of Central and northern Togo are known and respected as very hard working people. They take pride in their yam fields covered with enormous yam mounds and they also take pride in their gigantic cotton harvest. What's even more amazing is that most villagers in Affem Kabye do all of the farm work by hand using very primitive tools; only a few in 1995 had the luxury of animal traction to facilitate the farm work. When the cotton company truck comes to the village, the public sp...

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.