1. Sierra Leone Lunch Prepared in Dambarra, Sierra Leone

    "It takes a village" not only to educate, but to eat too!

  2. Sierra Leone Katy and KT Sierra Leone

    Katy holds "KT", her namesake.

  3. Sierra Leone Sierra Leone Travel Motorcycle

    Motocycles, better than walking?  Most of the time.  Good ol' Hondas were tough, but not tougher than Sierra Leone!

  4. Guatemala My Peace Corps Service--Avoiding War Through Service

                    Like some Peace Corps Volunteers of an earlier era, my decision to join the Peace Corps was shaped by the events on the ground when I volunteered.  In the 1960s, it was the Vietnam War and the draft; the Peace Corps was one way to defer draft eligibility.  For me, in the 1980s, it was AIDS; the Peace Corps was my way of avoiding that “war” of my generation, my way of deferring being drafted into the AIDS epidemic.  In both cases, volunteers were hoping to avoid death while man...

  5. Democratic Republic of Congo Celebrating MLK Day

    I remember tuning in the shortwave radio to pull the celebration of the first nationally recognized holiday in Dr. King's memory.  The battery was taken from the moto for this day.  We sat under the little lemon tree in my parcel and I was awestruck - half a world away, in the land of my ancestors, on the day the United States finally honored him.  Tears streamed down my face as I began to explain in Tshiluba what this meant to me and millions of other African Americans.  My kids, who all cal...

  6. Guatemala Training Room

    This is my bedroom in my host family's house.  There was no ensuite bathroom!  In fact, the bathroom wasn't exactly in the house!

  7. Guatemala My Peace Corps Family

    My host siblings and me hanging out at the training center.

  8. Togo Good friends

    One of my dissappointments in Togo was that I didn't get to live in a mud hut.  There was a cement factory in Tabligbo that had been built by the Swiss (I think). They had also built several housing developments for the workers.  The housing was not filled, so we were lodged there.  I had a very nice three bedroom villa with running water and a kitchen, but not much furniture.  These are volunteers plus our friend Sim (Ghanaian). 

  9. Togo Don and his wives

    Conan (in the back), Don, Ann, Linda and I went through training together. We were all teachers in different villages.  Linda and I were in the same village.  Don had a great house near the coast and was a wonderful host, so we visited him a lot.  As a result, we were considered to be his wives. 

  10. The Gambia Joankunda

    Joankunda was the head wife of my host family. She was the one who understood me before anyone else did. After twenty-five years away from each other, we still had a strong bond.

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“Sunset at the Railroad” by PCV Nicholas Baylor Hall. Namibia, 2011.